UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS-MONTICELLO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIVISION OF NURSING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL ASSESSMENT REPORT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Year 2004 - 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment of the Division of Nursing

 

Please address each of the following questions in a narrative format.  Include the question at the beginning of each response.

 

  1. How does the Division of Nursing’s mission statement and goals flow from and contribute to the University’s mission statement?       

                                                                                                                                

 

            The mission and philosophy of the Division of Nursing (DON) is congruent with that of the University of Arkansas-Monticello (UAM).  The mission of UAM and the mission and philosophy of the Division of Nursing are clearly stated and presented in the following pages, along with an explanation of the consistency of one with the other.

 

Mission

            The overall mission of the Division of Nursing is to strive for excellence in the preparation of professional (Bachelor of Science) nurse generalists.  This mission is accomplished through the following goals for BSN program graduates:

1.  The preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals,

families, and communities within a variety of health care settings.

2.  The encouragement of critical thinking to guide nursing interventions

which promote, maintain, and restore health.

3.  The development of accountability through a commitment to professional

nursing practice and lifelong learning (BSN Student Handbook, p 1)

 

The Overall mission of the Division of Nursing is also to strive for excellence in the preparation of technical (Associate of Applied Science) nurse generalists .  This Mission is accomplished through the following goals:

  1. Preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, and families in communities in structured settings.
  2. Encouragement of critical thinking to guide therapeutic nursing interventions which promote, maintain, and restore health.
  3. Development of accountability through a commitment to the practice of technical nursing and lifelong learning.  (AASN Student Handbook, p. 2).

 

 

 

Philosophy

            The faculty of the Division of Nursing hold the following beliefs about the major concepts of person, environment, health, professional and technical nursing and professional and technical nursing education.

Person

            Person is viewed as an individual, a family, and/or a community and as a holistic adaptive system in constant interaction with an increasingly interconnected global environment.  This interaction creates a complex and developing person who has common and unique needs throughout the lifespan.  These needs guide the person to use innate and acquired coping mechanisms in four adaptive modes to produce responses which promote goal adaptation and need integrity.

Environment

            Environment includes all internal and external stimuli that affect development and responses.  Environmental stimuli influence the person to produce responses that promote goal adaptation and need integrity.

Health

            Health is a process of being and becoming an integrated holistic person by continuously adapting to change.  Adaptive responses enhance goal adaptation and need integrity and, thus, promote, maintain, and restore health.  Health is viewed as a continuum throughout the lifespan that is influenced by a person’s risk reduction behaviors and adaptive responses which promote goal adaptation and need integrity.  Persons unable to successfully adapt have ineffective responses and are considered ill.

Professional Nursing

            Professional nursing is an art and a science.  Caring and value-based beliefs are integral to professional nursing.  The goal of nursing is to assist the person to develop risk reduction behaviors and adaptive responses and, thus, promote, maintain, and restore health throughout the lifespan.  Critical thinking is used to implement the nursing process in accomplishing the goal of nursing and to apply research findings which improve nursing practice.  The professional nurse uses leadership skills in communicating, collaborating, and negotiating with consumers and other members of the health care team in the delivery and promotion of health services.  Prepared at the baccalaureate level, the nurse enacts three major roles: provider of care, coordinator of care, and professional.

Technical Nursing

     Technical nursing is an art and a science.  The goal of nursing is to assist the person to develop adaptive responses and, thus, promote, maintain, and restore health throughout the life span.  Critical thinking is used to implement the nursing process in accomplishing the goal of nursing and to use research findings which improve nursing practice.  The technical nurse uses management skills in communicating and collaborating with consumers and other members of the health care team in the delivery and promotion of health services.  The technical nurse enacts three major roles:  provider of care, coordinator of care, and member of the discipline of nursing.

Professional Nursing Education

            Professional nursing education is based upon a liberal arts and science foundation.  This foundation forms the basis for the evidence-based practice of professional nursing as a generalist.  Baccalaureate education prepares students for entry-level professional practice within a variety of settings with culturally diverse populations as well as provides a foundation for graduate study.  The process of professional nursing education guides the student in the acquisition of nursing knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values.  The teaching/learning process fosters mutual respect and trust, intellectual development, reflection, critical thinking, and lifelong learning. 

Technical Nursing Education

       Technical nursing education is the process by which students are introduced to the role of the Associate Degree Registered Nurse.  This process is best accomplished in an institution of higher learning.  Although the set of competencies expected at each level of nursing practice is different, there is a common base of interpersonal and intellectual competencies which provide the foundation of nursing practice upon which each advanced level is built.  The depth and scope of the knowledge base, therefore, differentiates the levels of nursing practice.  Technical nursing education builds upon the foundation of fundamental nursing knowledge and skills acquired at the level of education of the licensed practical nurse (LPN) and integrates the concepts and principles of the natural and social sciences.  Technical nursing education prepares students for entry level practice in structured settings and provides a foundation for baccalaureate study.  The process of technical nursing education guides the student in the acquisition of nursing knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values.  The teaching/learning process fosters intellectual development, critical thinking, and lifelong learning.

       Additionally, the UAM educational programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree and the Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree are appropriate for the legal practice of registered nursing. The scope of practice for registered nursing is stipulated in the Arkansas State Nurse Practice Act and for current approval of the DON nursing programs by the Arkansas State Board of Nursing.  The BSN program is also approved by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission.  The Division of Nursing’s mission and goals are readily accessible to the general public, students and potential students at the UAM web site,  http://www.uamont.edu/nursing/index.htm.  Further, information pertaining to the professional (BSN) and technical (AASN) nurse programs is in the UAM Catalog.  The UAM Catalog is free and is offered to prospective students who inquire about the BSN or AASN programs, including those who are being interviewed by the Division of Nursing Chair or faculty.  The UAM Catalog is also available at: http://www.uamont.edu/catalogs.html.   The syllabi objectives for each course offered by the Division of Nursing include an explanation of the purposes and objectives of the course.  The mission, goals and philosophy can be found in the BSN Division of Nursing Student Handbook (p. 1) and in the AASN Division of Nursing Student Handbook (p. 1 and 2).

2.  Consistency of Nursing Mission and Goals With Those of the Governing Organization

            The mission of UAM and the Division of Nursing are consistent, one with the other.  They are further explained with cited examples in the following passages.  The mission of UAM is to search for truth and understanding through scholastic pursuits and to strive for excellence in all its endeavors.  The overall mission of the Division of Nursing is to strive for excellence in the preparation of professional or technical nurse generalists which is consistent with the UAM mission.  UAM is committed to quality education which promotes individual achievement and personal development.  Learning activities provided are intended to enhance the students’ capability to function responsibly and creatively as a member of society and within their own and other cultures.  The mission statement addresses sharing knowledge, educating people for critical thought, promoting the intellectual content of society, providing learning experiences, and offering a well-rounded program of general education.  One of the goals of the Division of Nursing is the encouragement of critical thinking to guide nursing interventions which promote, maintain, and restore health.

            The Division of Nursing views the process of professional and technical nursing education as a scholastic endeavor which guides individuals in the acquisition of nursing knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values, and believes this process is best accomplished in an institution of higher learning where the individual has access to varied academic disciplines and where changes in behavior can be validated.  Professional and technical nursing education are based upon a liberal arts and science foundation and forms the basis for the evidence-based practice of professional or technical nursing as a generalist.  The Division of Nursing shares with UAM the aim of excellence by requiring a strong background in general education which serves to enhance the ability of the student to function responsibly and creatively as a member of society.

            The mission of UAM is to provide learning experiences which enable students to synthesize knowledge, communicate effectively, use knowledge and technology with intelligence, and act responsibly within their own and other cultures. 

           The beliefs of the Division of Nursing are consistent with UAM’s mission because the Division’s philosophy stipulates that the professional or technical nurse communicates, collaborates, and negotiates with consumers and other members of the health care team in the delivery and promotion of health services.  A goal of the Division of Nursing is the development of accountability through a commitment to professional or technical nursing practice.  The nursing process is one of the vehicles used to enable students to synthesize knowledge through critical thinking, to communicate effectively, to use technology with intelligence and responsibility, and to act creatively within their own and other cultures.  The nursing faculty believes the person (individual, family, and/or community) has common and unique needs throughout the lifespan and the professional and technical nurse uses the nursing process to assist the person to promote, maintain, and restore health (Division of Nursing Faculty Handbook, pp. 1 and 11).

            Another goal of UAM is to offer quality educational opportunities in the form of baccalaureate or technical preparation and certification in a variety of fields.  This is consistent with the offerings of the Division of Nursing which include curricula that prepare students for careers as Registered Nurses and which provide students with the basic knowledge needed to take the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) and to practice as a professional or technical nurse generalist.  This is also consistent with the UAM goal of providing contemporary curricula which prepare students for careers in selected fields, for personal development, and for meeting social needs.  Additionally, the preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, and/or communities within a variety of health care settings (structured settings for the technical nurse) meets societal needs is a goal of the Division of Nursing.

            UAM seeks to fulfill its mission statement through a commitment to provide an environment which fosters individual achievement and personal development.  The Division of Nursing adheres to the belief that the process of professional or technical nursing education fosters intellectual growth and effective interpersonal relationships and communication.

            UAM’s mission statement includes a goal to encourage personal responsibility and seeking the benefits of lifelong learning.  A goal of the Division of Nursing is the development of accountability through a commitment to professional or technical nursing practice and lifelong learning.  Additionally, the Division of Nursing philosophy states that the nursing programs foster lifelong learning.  UAM and the Division of Nursing resources are offered as a service to the community to create an environment conducive to continued learning (Division of Nursing Faculty Handbook, p. 2 and 10).  The Division of Nursing supports the belief in assisting nurses in continuing their education.  Transfer students are evaluated on an individual basis for validation of previous learning.  These offerings are consistent with UAM’s mission of providing opportunities in higher education for both traditional and non-traditional students and of providing viable programs of public service, continuing education in selected areas, and cooperative programs with other educational institutions.

            Maintaining regional and national recognition of UAM and its academic programs through accreditation is stated in the UAM Catalog (p. 9). The faculty of the Division of Nursing believes accreditation standards enhance quality education and, therefore, support and participate in all voluntary regional and national accreditation processes.

3.  Commitment to a Diverse Community

            The mission of UAM is to provide learning experiences which enable students to act creatively within their own and other cultures.  A goal of the Division of Nursing is to prepare graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, and communities within a variety of health care settings (structured setting for the technical nurse) to which demonstrate an underlying commitment to a diverse community.  UAM and the Division of Nursing reflect this commitment to a diverse community through a policy of providing educational opportunities to all qualified students, regardless of their economic or social status, and not discriminating on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, gender, ethnic or national origin, disability, age, or any legally protected class.  Additionally, public, student, and potential student accessibility to programs of study, academic policies, advising and assistance as well as registration, housing and financial assistance is readily available in the UAM Catalog and through personal or telephone contact.  Program information is also readily available via UAM’s home page: http//www.uamont.edu/home.asp.  The Office of Special Student Services is designated to ensure disabled students are given the same rights and services as other students at UAM (UAM Catalog, p. 4). The “open door” admission policy of UAM reflects the philosophy that educational opportunities must be available to all citizens in the area it serves (UAM Catalog, p. 4).  Caucasian (white) students comprise the larger number of students enrolled at UAM and in the Division of Nursing as nursing majors.  African-American students are the next largest number of students enrolled at UAM as nursing majors.  All students of any ethnic or racial group are encouraged to enroll as a student at UAM and in the Division of Nursing.  A comparison of minority (those who are not Caucasian) students at UAM and those as nursing majors are numerically compared to the total student enrollment in Table 1-A.  Additionally, international students enrolled at UAM (UAM Catalog, p. 22).   The UAM mission speaks specifically to providing support programs which increase the probability of success for those students needing additional academic preparation to meet college standards.  In addition, academic support units are provided by UAM.  These academic supportive units include the Library, Writing Center, and Information Technology (UAM Catalog, pp. 10-11).

Table 1-A

Comparison of UAM and DON Minority Enrollment With Total UAM Enrollment

YEAR UAM

ENROLLMENT       

% MINORITY  STUDENTS          

% MINORITY NURSING STUDENTS (NURSING MAJORS)

1998-1999       2094    20  (n=416)      9   (n=38)

1999-2000       2254    25  (n=554)      8   (n=42)

2000-2001       2323    25  (n=572)      11 (n=63)

2001-2002       2332    25  (n=583)      13 (n=75)

2002-2003      2482     27  (n=658)     15 (n=100)

2003-2004      2875     29  (n= 848)     13 (n=112)*

2004-2005      2942     33  (n=961)      14 (n=136)**

*2003-2004 reflects minority nursing majors on University of Arkansas-Monticello Campus only

** 2004-2005 reflects student enrollment on the main campus and at the technology campuses. 

 

Total Number of Nursing Majors on Monticello Campus of UAM

Fall 2001:  160

Fall 2002:  267

Fall 2003:  311

Fall 2004:  352

            UAM and the Division of Nursing demonstrate a commitment to a diverse faculty by implementing a policy of providing employment opportunities to all persons, regardless of their economic or social status, and not discriminating on the basis of disability, race, color, religion, creed, gender, ethnic or national origin, age, or any legally protected class (College Catalog, p 4).  To reach as many women and minority applicants as possible, the Office of Human Relations advertises faculty and professional staff positions in The Chronicle of Higher Education, a nationally recognized publication; in The Arkansas Democrat Gazette, a state-wide newspaper; in The Dallas Morning News, a large metropolitan newspaper; and in The Journal of Nursing Education, a publication serving a national nurse educator audience.  Position announcements for faculty and professional staff are periodically mailed to historically African-American institutions in surrounding states and to African-American educational and professional organizations.  The Division of Nursing has had five African-American faculty members since 1994 and currently two African-American faculty.  One is master’s prepared and the other is prepared at the BSN level.  Additionally, there is one African-American clinical adjunct faculty presently. In the previous year, we have had two African-American clinical adjunct faculty.  In the last three years, there have been three men on the faculty in the Division of Nursing.  Currently, there is one male instructor as well as the male Division of Nursing Chair serving on faculty.  The Division of Nursing faculty believes it is important for males majoring in nursing to have male faculty role models with which to identify while completing their nursing education.  Men have always been encouraged to enroll as a student in the Division of Nursing.  In addition, faculty demonstrates a commitment to ethnic and racial diversity through student clinical experiences.

4.  Commitment to a Set of Socially Responsible Standards of Professional Nursing

            The mission and goals of UAM and the Division of Nursing support a commitment to socially responsible standards by offering quality educational opportunities to students.  A goal of the Division of Nursing is the development of accountability through a commitment to professional nursing practice.  The faculty of the UAM Division of Nursing consider standards to be a critical element in the educational process of professional nurses and has operationalized practice standards into professional preparation by adopting the American Nurses’ Association (ANA) Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements and ANA’s Standards of Clinical Practice as the basis of the professional role (Division of Nursing BSN Student Handbook, p. 10; Division of Nursing AASN Student Handbook, p. 10).  These standards of practice are consistent with the contemporary belief of the profession and are emphasized in each nursing course.  They serve as a guide for students in meeting clinical objectives.  Course syllabi and content emphasize learning experiences congruent with standards of professional nursing practice.  Junior and senior BSN and AASN nursing students have been informed of ANA Code for Nurses and the ANA Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements has been incorporated into nursing course syllabi.

5.  How are the major field assessments based on the mission and goals of the academic unit and University?

        Consistent with the mission of the University of Arkansas-Monticello (UAM) (see Criteria 1), the mission of the Division of Nursing is to strive for excellence in the preparation of professional and technical nurse generalists.  This mission is accomplished through the following goals:  (1) the preparation of graduates to provide nursing care for individuals, families, and communities within a variety of health care settings (structured health care settings for the technical nurse); (2) the encouragement of critical thinking to guide nursing interventions which promote, maintain, and restore health; and (3) the development of accountability through a commitment to professional nursing practice and lifelong learning.

            The mission, goals, philosophy, organizing framework and strands with outcomes serve as the basis for planning and organizing the nursing curriculum.  The curriculum for the nursing program is consistent with the mission of the Division of Nursing.  Flowing from the mission, goals, philosophy and organizing framework are six curricular strands for the professional nursing program (nursing process, critical thinking, communication, research, leadership, and teaching/learning), and five for the technical nurse program (nursing process, critical thinking, communication, management, and teaching/learning).  The curricular strands for both programs have been developed into program outcomes.  Each strand is used as the basis of the course objectives for each nursing course.  As students progress in the curriculum, strands are developed and further delineated into course objectives, content and learning experiences.

            The integrity of the curriculum is evidenced by congruence among the organizing framework, program objectives, curriculum design, course progression, and outcome measures.  The mission, goals, philosophy, organizing framework, strands, and outcomes for the BSN program are introduced in NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles, the first nursing course.  Beginning with NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I and with each subsequent Concepts Course (II-IV), the mission, goals, philosophy, organizing framework, strands, and outcomes are presented and reviewed with students. 

The same plan is followed with the AASN program from NURS 1034 LPN-RN Transition to NURS 1015 Principles of Nursing Care I through NURS 124V Principles of Nursing Care II, and NURS 225V Principles of Nursing Care III.

Therefore, there is consistency between the nursing curriculum, mission and program outcomes.  Further evidence of consistency is available in course syllabi and samples of student papers and projects which are available.  Specific definitions utilized in the nursing curriculum can be seen in the Division of Nursing Faculty Handbook (pp. 6, 15).  Teaching and learning principles, one of the curriculum strands can be seen in the Division of Nursing Faculty Handbook (p. 35).  For more information, see the following tables.

Table 2

Congruence among organizing framework, program objectives, curriculum design, course progression and outcome measures

 

 

 


CURRICULAR STRAND:   Nursing Process

 

MISSION

. . . preparation of professional and technical nurse generalists.  . . . provide nursing care, . . .  guide nursing interventions, . . .  professional or technical nursing practice.

 

PHILOSOPHY

Professional or technical nursing education . . . forms the basis for the evidence-based practice of professional and technical nursing as a generalist.  Baccalaureate and technical nurse education prepares students for entry level practice as a registered nurse.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

The goal of nursing is accomplished through the nursing process.  The professional and technical nurse use the nursing process to support successful goal adaptation or to identify ineffective responses and design a plan of care with the client to promote goal adaptation and need integrity. The nurse uses assessment data in collaboration with the client to establish nursing diagnosis(es), goals, and priorities according to evidence-based practice.  Based on this assessment data, the nurse designs and implements culturally sensitive care through therapeutic interventions to promote, maintain, and restore health.  The nurse and client evaluate the outcomes of care for effectiveness in promoting adaptation.

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

Use the nursing process to provide therapeutic nursing interventions to promote, maintain, and restore the health of culturally and ethnically diverse individuals, families, and/or communities (technical nurse in structured settings) throughout the lifespan.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles introduces students to the mission, philosophy, organizing framework, nursing history, and nursing process.  Steps of the nursing process are presented.  NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I and subsequent Concepts Courses (II-IV) use the nursing process progressively to first care for individuals, then families, and subsequently introduction to communities.  Social and global concerns are addressed as well.  The nursing process is used in its entirety in each Concepts Course (I-IV) with the emphasis being placed on specific physiological and psychosocial needs and modes.  Students formulate nursing care plans with the specific physiological needs and modes emphasized for student assigned clients in Concepts I.  In Concepts II students progress to analyzing standardized nursing care plans (agency generated)  and individualizing them for the assigned client.  In Concepts III standardized nursing care plans are analyzed and individualized for assigned clients and by Concepts IV students generate nursing care plans for groups of clients.  NURS 4473 Nursing Research introduces the students to the research process.  The steps of the research process and nursing process are compared and similarities and differences are discussed.  NURS 4504 Leadership and Management in Professional Nursing allows students to implement the nursing process when leading staff while managing the nursing care of clients during a practicum experience.  A similar plan is instituted with the technical nurse program from the LPN to RN Transition course and Principles in Nursing Care I through Principles of Nursing Care III.

 

 

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Table 3

CURRICULAR STRAND:   Critical Thinking

 

MISSION

 . . strive for excellence in the preparation of professional or technical nurse generalists.

 

GOAL

 . . the encouragement of critical thinking to guide nursing interventions.

 

PHILOSOPHY

Critical thinking is used to implement the nursing process.  The teaching/learning process fosters mutual respect and trust, intellectual development, reflection, critical thinking, and lifelong learning.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

The nursing process requires use of critical thinking.

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

Formulate judgments using a problem solving process that is goal directed, ethical and based on standards of professional practice.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

A variety of critical thinking activities are used throughout the BSN and AASN curriculum such as case studies for clients, student presentations, and games.  Students use critical thinking throughout the program as they provide culturally sensitive nursing care to clients.  Critical thinking is encouraged as the basis for decision making relevant to client care needs and how they will best be addressed.  For example, students develop a nursing care plan for an assigned individual client in an acute care setting.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4

CURRICULAR STRAND:    Communication

 

MISSION

    . . . strive for excellence in the preparation of professional nurse generalists.

 

GOAL

    . . . provide nursing care for individuals, families, and communities (structured setting for the AASN program students).                       

 

PHILOSOPHY

    . . . communicating, collaborating and negotiating with consumers and other members of the health care team.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

    . . . communicate and collaborate with members of the health care team and consumers to improve care.

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

Communicate and collaborate with members of the health care team and consumers to provide and improve delivery of health care.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

In the professional nursing curriculum, communication is introduced in NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles where various models of communication, levels and types of communication, and communication skills throughout the lifespan are discussed. The same information is introduced in the technical nurse curriculum in the LPN to RN Role Transition course.  In NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I (professional nurse), and in Principles of Nursing Care I (technical nurse) therapeutic communication is presented and specific therapeutic skills are implemented and evaluated.   Process recordings are required in Concepts Courses (I-IV) and in Principles of Nursing Care (I – III).  Communication is evaluated through the Clinical Evaluation Tool requiring students to communicate, collaborate and negotiate with members of the health care team.  This is implemented by reporting to health care team members and documentation on the client record in the clinical area.  Classroom reports are also activities which allow professional and technical students to demonstrate effective communication.

 

 

 

Table 5

CURRICULAR STRAND:    Research (Professional Nurse)

 

MISSION

            . . . strive for excellence in the preparation of professional nurse generalists.

 

GOAL

            . . . encouragement of critical thinking.

            . . . commitment to professional nursing practice and lifelong learning.

 

PHILOSOPHY

            . . . apply research findings which improve nursing practice. 

            . . . provides a foundation for graduate study.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

            . . . application of research findings to improve nursing practice.

 

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

            Reflect critical thinking to critique and apply research findings in nursing practice.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

Abstracts are required in a majority of the courses related to recent research in particular areas of emphasis.  For instance, the focus in NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I is on the physiological needs of activity and rest and sensation.  Students are required to identify a research article and submit an abstract related to activity and rest, sensation and interdependence.  Faculty assist students in identifying useful research findings by describing how to locate and identify a research article prior to NURS 4473 Nursing Research.  A list of recommended journals and web sites are also identified to assist in locating research articles.  In Nursing Research students are required to apply research findings in caring for clients in the clinical area and are evaluated on the Clinical Evaluation Tool each week.  Research findings are identified in clinical journals.  Specific class objectives are used to relate current research in areas of emphasis.  NURS 4473 Nursing Research requires students to implement the steps of the research process in completing a project.  Students also learn the process of evaluating research through critiquing a research article as a small group project.   Nursing Research also requires students to recommend modifications in nursing practice based upon an analysis of the literature.  Students critique the literature to determine the merits of research findings. 

 

 

Table 6

CURRICULAR STRAND:    Leadership for professional nurse students and Management for technical nurse students

 

MISSION

            . . . strive for excellence in the preparation of professional or technical nurse generalists.

 

GOAL

            . . . development of accountability through a commitment to professional or technical nursing practice and lifelong learning.

 

PHILOSOPHY

            . . . uses leadership (professional) or management (professional and technical nurse) skills in communicating, collaborating and negotiating with consumers and other        members of the health care team in the delivery and promotion of health services. 

            . . . enacts three major roles: provider of care, coordinator of care, and professional.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

            Professional nurse role responsibilities include: using leadership and management skills, cost effective strategies, and knowledge of the political and legal system to communicate, collaborate, and negotiate lifelong learning ...to promote excellence in nursing involvement in community service and application of research findings to improve nursing practice.   The role responsibility is the same for the technical nurse except that management is emphasized instead of leadership.

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

Apply leadership and management skills to provide cost-effective quality health care to implement and support change, and serve as a client advocate in a variety of settings. Application of management skills are emphasized for the technical nurse.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

Leadership is first introduced in NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles where it is discussed as a component of the professional role of the nurse.  Leader and manager characteristics are identified and compared in the professional and technical nurse curriculum.  Change and advocacy are also first introduced in NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles, specifically, as components of the professional role of the nurse which include client advocacy and change agent.  Cost effectiveness as a component of leadership is implemented in NURS 333V Concepts in Nursing Care I, by students promoting cost effectiveness in providing care.  Cost effectiveness is evaluated each clinical week through the Clinical Evaluation Tool and clinical journals.  NURS 332V Concepts in Nursing Care II builds on cost effectiveness by requiring students to implement strategies to promote cost effectiveness while providing client care and is evaluated in the same manner as Concepts I.  Principles of Nursing Care II and III emphasize cost effectiveness in planning of client care in the technical nurse curriculum in clinical nurse care plans and is evaluated in the Clinical Evaluation Tool.

 

 Leadership is fostered by having professional students work in groups for different learning activities as well as for presentations.  Each year, professional and technical students are required to attend the Arkansas State Nursing Students Association (ASNSA) Convention.  Students demonstrate leadership by joining the Student Nurses Association at local, state, and national levels and by holding offices locally and at the state level.  Professional and technical students develop a staffing and scheduling plan that ensures sufficient numbers of personnel, quality of care, and maintenance of cost effectiveness in the clinical area.

 

 

Table 7

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CURRICULAR STRAND:   Teaching/Learning

 

MISSION

            . . . strive for excellence in the preparation of professional and technical nurse generalists.

 

GOAL

            . . . provide nursing care for individuals, families, and communities.

            . . . commitment to professional and technical nursing practice and lifelong learning.

 

PHILOSOPHY

The teaching/learning process fosters mutual respect and trust, intellectual development,

reflection, critical thinking and lifelong learning.  Professional and technical nursing education . . . forms the basis for the evidence-based practice of professional or technical nursing as a generalist.

. . . professional and technical nursing education guides the student in the acquisition of nursing knowledge, skills, attitudes and values.

 

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORK

            Professional role responsibilities include: using leadership and/or management skills, cost effective strategies, and knowledge of the political and legal system to communicate, collaborate, and negotiate with members of the health care team and consumers to improve health care; lifelong learning ...to promote excellence in nursing involvement in community service.  In collaboration, the teacher and learner initiate, direct, and are accountable for meaningful learning experiences.

             Technical role responsibilities include:  using management skills, cost effective strategies, and interpersonal skills to collaborate with members of the health care team and consumers to improve health care, lifelong learning….to promote excellence in nursing involvement in community service.  In collaboration, the teacher and learner initiate, direct, and are accountable for meaningful learning experiences.          

 

PROGRAM OUTCOME

Educate individuals, families, and communities using teaching/learning principles which promote, maintain, and restore health.

 

CURRICULAR EXAMPLES

Teaching and learning in the professional nurse curriculum are first introduced in NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles by defining the concepts and identifying each of the teaching/learning principles which are used to educate individuals, families, and communities.  Students also identify their own learning style through implementation of a standardized test.  In NURS 311V Concepts in Nursing Care I students differentiate teaching and learning and various types of learning as well as apply teaching/learning principles in educating clients to promote, maintain and restore health.  The Division of Nursing identifies eleven teaching/learning principles ( UAM Nursing BSN Student Handbook, p 28; UAM Nursing AASN Student Handbook, p. 27).  In all clinical courses, students are required to identify learning needs of clients and to plan and implement a teaching plan for each assigned client and/or family.  Students must identify teaching/learning principles used in the plan by documentation in the nursing care plan and teaching plan.  In addition to documentation of a teaching/learning plan on the nursing care plan, students apply teaching/learning principles in various ways. NURS 332V Concepts in Nursing Care II require students to address knowledge deficit on the Family Assessment.  NURS 444V Concepts in Nursing Care III require group presentations related to teaching for various aspects of diabetes mellitus.  In NURS 452V Concepts in Nursing Care IV, students implement formal teaching to a community based on an assessment performed in NURS 4153: Community Health Nursing.  NURS 4473 Nursing Research encourages students to apply teaching/learning principles while presenting research findings.  Students present teaching topics to their peers and receive points for the oral report and use of audiovisual aids.  NURS 4504 Nursing Leadership and Management in Professional Nursing require students to apply teaching/learning principles to staff education.   A similar program relevant to meeting learning needs of clients is instituted in the LPN to RN Role Transition (technical nurse) course and is included in Principles of Nursing Care I, II, and III.

 

 

6..  Nursing Curriculum and Professional Nursing Standards

            Professional and technical nursing standards, previously discussed, guide student learning experiences and decision-making.  Professional and technical nursing standards, based on the American Nurses Association (ANA) Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice and the ANA Code For Nurses with Interpretive Statements, are introduced in the first professional nursing course, NURS 2003 Introduction to Nursing Concepts and Roles.  The same content is introduced in the technical nurse curriculum in the LPN to RN  Transition Course.  The standards are re-emphasized in each nursing course while reviewing the course overview during the first class and in specific class content and learning activities.  For instance, the standards are contained in the UAM Division of Nursing BSN Student Handbook, p. 11; UAM Division of Nursing AASN Student Handbook, p. 10).  Division of Nursing Student Handbooks are a required student purchase.

            Standards of practice are integrated through the professional and technical nurse program outcome, related to critical thinking.  This outcome states that the graduate will be prepared to: “formulate judgments using a problem solving process that is goal directed, ethical, and based on standards of professional or technical nursing practice”.   Practice standards are also discussed with the introduction of each specialty area of content such as psychiatric-mental health, maternal-child health and end-of-life, etc.  Standards of practice are included as class objectives and course assignments as well.

            The ANA Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice and the ANA Code for Nurses With Interpretive Statements are incorporated in the clinical evaluation tool (CET).  The CET is based on the major roles of the professional and technical nurse as identified in the philosophy (provider of care, coordinator of care, and professional or technical nurse).  Thus, the standards guide each student’s actions and are developed further in each subsequent clinical course.  The CET is included in course syllabi and is reviewed with students in each clinical course prior to clinical activities.  Student performance is evaluated for each clinical experience and reviewed with the student in weekly clinical conferences. 

Summary

            The curriculum is clearly linked through the program outcomes to the mission and goals of the Division of Nursing which are consistent with the mission of UAM.  Six curriculum strands (nursing process, critical thinking, communication, research, leadership, teaching/learning) guide implementation of the professional nurse curriculum. Five curriculum strands (nursing process, critical thinking, communication, management, teaching/learning) guide implementation of the technical nurse curriculum.  The nursing curriculum was developed from UAM’s mission and is consistent with the Division of Nursing’s mission.  Professional or technical standards of practice are reflected and integrated throughout the nursing curriculum.

  1. How are the data being gathered to support assessment of the academic unit’s goals and mission? 

      Data are being gathered in the following ways:

    1. Course examinations that are written to measure course learning objectives.
    2. Oral presentations to achieve specific measurable learning objectives.
    3. Clinical assignments such as nursing care plans, interpersonal process recordings, journals, and abstracts that measure specific learning objectives as specified in course syllabi.
    4. Group collaborative efforts that are presented in class or to the faculty which meet specified course objectives. 
    5. Student evaluations of courses, faculty, and clinical sites
    6. Student evaluations of their overall experiences in the Division of Nursing at the end of the program, at one year, and at five years.
    7. Employer evaluations of our graduates as employees in the various fields of nursing at one and five years.
  1. Describe how faculty are involved in the process(es) of assessing student learning.
    1. Writing measurable learning objectives for each course.
    2. Writing test items that measure accomplishment of course learning objectives in each course syllabus.
    3. Evaluating results on examinations and worthiness of test items as reflected on number of students who answered each question correctly and making necessary adjustments if necessary.
    4. Evaluating results of practical examinations given in the skills laboratory of the Division of Nursing based on specific measurable course objectives
    5. Evaluating student’s clinical written work, observing and evaluating clinical work directly based on specific learning objectives.
    6. Evaluating student’s course written work, class presentations, and group projects based on specified learning objectives.
    7. Perusing student course evaluations, end of program evaluations, and graduate employee evaluations at one and five years for indicators that improvement is needed. 
    8. Evaluating results of graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) which provide for state licensure as a prerequisite for employment as a registered nurse. Reports are received from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing relevant to areas of strengths and weakness of graduates. All results are evaluated for necessary adjustments in curriculum and instruction.
  2. Describe your use of multiple forms of data gathering to assess student learning. 

See number “4” above.

  1. Describe how both faculty and students are given feedback concerning assessment results.
    1. Reports of course evaluations, end of program and 1 and 5-year evaluations are given to the faculty and to student representatives on the curriculum committees.  Students committee representatives take reports back to their respective classes.  Records of minutes are kept in the Division of Nursing and are available for inspection.
    2. Reports of student achievement on examinations, written work, oral presentations, etc. are given during curriculum meetings as well as student course evaluation results.  Adjustments are made, if necessary, based on evaluation results (changes in curriculum or instruction).
    3. Criteria for program evaluation are specified by faculty and are evaluated annually. 
    4. Reports of results of graduates on the NCLEX-RN are given in faculty meetings by the Division Chair.  If changes are needed, a discussion of the best course to follow ensues and changes are made appropriately.
  2. Describe how both faculty and students are given feedback concerning assessment results.

Results of evaluations are given in faculty or in curriculum meetings where there are student representatives.   Student representatives take information back to their respective classes and make the announcement or faculty or the Chair of the Division of Nursing will make announcements.  Necessary changes in curriculum are made in advance and students are notified by faculty.

  1. Describe how your assessment plan is cost effective and reflects access, equity and diversity.
    1. Cost effective:  Our assessment plan relates to outcomes on NCLEX-RN, written work of students, etc.  The results are easily obtainable from each faculty member or from records kept by the Division Chair, or from reports of NCLEX-RN pass rates received quarterly from the Arkansas State Board of Nursing.  Course evaluations, end of program evaluations, and one and five year evaluations are reviewed by faculty in faculty or curriculum meetings as they are received during class or from mailings.  Cost is kept to a minimum. 
    2. Access:  Minutes are kept of faculty and curriculum meetings.  Records of NCLEX-RN performance and end of program, one and five year evaluations are kept by the Division Chair.  Reports are made during faculty and curriculum meetings and are available for inspection to appropriate persons in minutes kept.
    3. Equity and diversity:  Assessments involve all students in the nursing program, including minority ethnic groups.   There is no discrimination based on ethnicity and UAM as well as the Division of Nursing has an open door policy for admission.  Retention in the program is based on successful completion of program learning objectives as specified in the syllabi for each course.  Records are kept on students who progress through the program or who are unsuccessful.  Records are available for perusal by appropriate investigators.
  2. How does your unit’s assessment system link to research on learning theories, constructing vs. acquiring knowledge, and active learning strategies?
    1. The assessment of our program in the Division of Nursing is based on the requirements of the Arkansas State Board of Nursing and The National League For Nursing Accrediting Commission requirements.  Further, these requirements are based on the Tylerian theoretical approach to program evaluation.   This evaluation method is a type of evaluation based on achievement of measurable learning objectives.  Course assignments are related to specific, measurable learning objectives at a variety of cognitive levels (usually at the application and analysis cognitive levels) and whether achieved by the students who is progressing through the program.  Student active learning as indicated through achievement of specified learning objectives are measured throughout the nursing program.  Another example of a theoretical approach used by faculty in the Division of Nursing is Gagne’s sequential learning steps as applied when nursing skills and health assessment is being taught.  Active learning of skills and their application by students is directly observable in the skills lab and in the clinical setting.
  3. How are students required to present verbal and written explanations of how their work products demonstrate attainment of publicly stated goals and objectives for their learning?

As with all course work in the various programs in the Division of Nursing, written course objectives indicate what the student is required to know or do.  All written and verbal presentations have stated measurable objectives for the presentation.  Students are evaluated based on achievement of those objectives as demonstrated in their written or verbal presentations, or on examinations. 

  1. How do course syllabi state measurable objectives for student learning and provide for the assessment of students’ academic achievement? 

The following is an example of some of the stated measurable learning objectives from a variety of courses offered in the Division of Nursing.  Assessment is based on student achievement of these objectives.  A grade average of 74 must be achieved on examinations to pass the course.  Written clinical work grade is based upon a grade scale that indicates satisfactory/unsatisfactory achievement of clinical objectives.  To receive a passing grade, all clinical work must be accomplished satisfactorily as specified in clinical objectives and a passing average must be achieved on course unit and comprehensive examinations. 

Examples of course objectives:

Upon successful completion of specified course, the student will be able to:

A.     Identify common threats to workplace safety for nurses and select preventive measures in given situations.

B.     Indicate legal issues to consider when accepting or rejecting a work assignment as a nurse.

C.     Explain the role of management in promoting ethical behavior in the workplace.

D.     Explain the physiology of defecation and urinary elimination.

E.      Plan nursing measures to provide a safe, effective care environment for clients with bowel and urinary disorders.

F.      Demonstrated the ability to make critical decisions based on simulated laboratory situations of nursing skill performance.

G.     Select a current health care or nursing issue that needs to be changed and indicate the political process for the change to occur.

H.     Explain the significance of professionalism in nursing.

I.        Select the four components of the metaparadigm of professional nursing.

J.       Write your own philosophy of nursing and communicate it to your class members along with supportive rationale.

K.    Explain the significance of research utilization projects in nursing.

 

15.  How are students involved in the assessment process?  For Example, do students participate in your unit’s assessment committee activities?

Students are members of the curriculum committee and are therefore involved in curriculum assessment.  They are representatives for their classes and dialogue is exchanged between students and their representative when communication is needed with faculty.  Additionally, students are encouraged to bring concerns or complaints directly to faculty or the Chair of the Division of Nursing.  Additionally, Students evaluate each course at the end of each course, they evaluate the entire program at the end of the program, and they evaluate the program at one and five years after graduation.  Providing feedback to the faculty allows the faculty to make curriculum/program changes when it is indicated.

PART II.  Please display data using charts and other summative measures where appropriate.

Supportive Data that Demonstrates Student Achievement.

  1. Alumni and employer , one and five year, post graduate surveys that indicate satisfaction with programs(s). 

See Appendix A

  1. Aggregated results of certification/licensure examinations that are required for post-graduation employment.

See Appendix B

  1. Exit interviews with graduating seniors that ask students to reflect on programs and experiences.

See Appendix C

  1. CAAP Scores (general education for your majors and how this information is used to improve both general educational experiences and majors. For example, writing scores are consistently below the mean for UAM students.  Consequently, how is writing reinforced/improved in both general education courses and subsequent major area courses?

Students who score low on math or English are required to take developmental math or English courses to improve their chance for success in course work at UAM and in the Division of Nursing.  One of the curricular strands for courses in the Division of Nursing is communication.  Students must be able to effectively communicate verbally and in writing as a nursing professional.  Effective communication is a requirement when communicating with patients, family or significant others, and health care professional colleagues.  It is evaluated as indicated in Part I, question 1. 

  1. Aggregated data from individual students, specified groups of students, and/or courses or groups of courses that describe and reflect the attainment of the academic unit’s goals and mission.  Examples of student data acquired from surveys, checklists, unit-level oral/written examinations, interviews, portfolios, etc, standardized national exams, internships, juried reviews and performances that reflect their achievement of predetermined goals and objectives.

See Appendix D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A

 

Alumni and Employer One and Five Year Survey

BSN Program

 

(AASN Program Not in Existence for Five Year Survey)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix B

 

Aggregated results of certification/licensure examinations that is required for post-graduation employment and which reflect other measures of

attainment of the Division of Nursing’s goals and mission

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix C

 

Exit Program Evaluation Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix D

 

Sample

National League for Nursing Achievement Exam Results

(Standardized Exam)

 

 

AASN

BSN

Programs