Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Classify and Map Trees Is the Subject of Recently-Published Research Paper

MONTICELLO, AR — The use of high-resolution imagery to map the distribution of trees in bottomland forests is the subject of a research paper published recently by a University of Arkansas at Monticello forestry student and his academic advisor.

            Bishwa Sapkota, a graduate student from Nepal enrolled in the UAM School of Forestry and Natural Resources, along with his advisor, Dr. Lu Liang, recently published work from their research in the Journal of Sustainable Forestry. The paper, entitled “A multi-step approach to classify full canopy and leafless trees in bottomland hardwoods using very high resolution imagery,” described how to map the distribution of trees in bottomland forests using remote sensing and GIS technologies. According to Dr. Phil Tappe, dean of the School of Forestry and Natural Resources, the results of the study can help forest managers gain insight into forest productivity, the presence of invasive species and provides guidelines for future remote sensing projects.

            The study was conducted in Clark County and supported by the Ross Foundation, Arkansas Forest Resources Center and USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

            The School of Forestry and Natural Resources and the Arkansas Forest Resources Center, a University of Arkansas System Center of Excellence, bring together interdisciplinary expertise through a partnership between the University of Arkansas at Monticello and the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture.  The School and Center are headquartered at the University of Arkansas at Monticello campus, but their programs range statewide.

            For more information, contact Dr. Phil Tappe at (870) 460-1052.

 

PHOTO CAPTION: Dr. Lu Liang (left) and graduate student Bishwa Sapkota, with a Sensefly EBee Plus fixed wing drone, which they used for aerial photogrammetry.

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