University of Arkansas-Monticello

 

School of Education

 

 

 

 

 

2004-2005

Assessment

Report

 

 

 

Submitted by

Dr. Michael J. Rosato

Dean, School of Education

August 1, 2005


School of Education

 

UNIT ASSESSMENT REPORT

 

2004-05

 

 

1.      Describe how your academic unit’s mission statement and goals flow from and contribute to the University’s mission statement.

 

School of Education Mission Statement

The University of Arkansas at Monticello School of Education is committed to the development of high quality teacher leaders who are caring, competent professionals dedicated to meeting the needs of a changing, diverse society.  The UAM School of Education faculty and teacher education students serve their communities through active participation in academic studies and field experiences that develop high-level competencies in content knowledge, pedagogy, professionalism, and equity.  The UAM School of Education, in close partnership and collaboration with partnering schools and the arts and sciences, is dedicated to providing the highest level of teacher training and excellence in southeast Arkansas.

 

University Mission Statement

The mission the University of Arkansas at Monticello shares with all universities is the commitment to search for truth and understanding through scholastic endeavor. The University seeks to enhance and share knowledge, to preserve and promote the intellectual content of society, and to educate people for critical thought.  The University provides learning experiences that enable students to synthesize knowledge, communicate effectively, use knowledge and technology with intelligence and responsibility, and act creatively within their own and other cultures. 

The University strives for excellence in all its endeavors. Educational opportunities encompass the liberal arts, basic and applied sciences, selected professions, and vocational/ technical preparation. These opportunities are founded in a strong program of general education and are fulfilled through contemporary disciplinary curricula, certification programs, and vocational/technical education or workforce training. The University assures opportunities in higher education for both traditional and non-traditional students and strives to provide an environment that fosters individual achievement and personal development. 

The University of Arkansas at Monticello seeks to fulfill its mission by: 1. Offering quality educational opportunities in the form of master’s, baccalaureate, and associate degree preparation, as well as certification in a variety of vocational/technical programs, or workforce training; 2. Offering a well-rounded program of general education designed to broaden and enrich students’ awareness of the world around them; 3. Providing contemporary curricula which prepare students for careers in selected fields, for personal development, and for meeting societal needs; 4. Strengthening students’ capabilities as thoughtful contributors to society by encouraging them to take personal responsibility and seeking the benefits of lifelong learning; 5. Providing support programs which increase the probability of success for those students needing additional academic preparation to meet college standards; 6. Assisting students in developing interpersonal skills needed by responsible and productive members of society; 7. Providing viable programs of public service, continuing education in selected areas, and cooperative programs with other educational institutions; 8. Promoting research programs which strengthen the institution and contribute new information to the existing body of knowledge and the extension of knowledge to serve the public; 9. Providing cultural and aesthetic experiences that will serve to enhance appreciation of the arts; 10. Maintaining regional and national recognition of the institution and its academic and technical programs by continuing to meet the standards of accrediting bodies, available but yet to be achieved; and 11. Preparing students to live and work in a technological and global society.

 

The entire School of Education (SOE) mission statement supports many concepts described in the university mission statements; these concepts are underscored in the university mission statement printed above.  Some examples of the most salient ways in which the SOE mission statement specifically supports the UAM mission statement are:

 

  • The SOE stated mission and commitment to developing high quality teachers who are caring, competent professionals supports the UAM mission to prepare students for careers in selected fields, for personal development, and for meeting societal needs;

 

  • The SOE stated mission and commitment to developing graduates to meeting the needs of a changing, diverse society supports the UAM mission to provide learning experiences that act creatively within their own and other cultures; and,

 

  • The SOE stated mission and commitment to developing graduates with high-level competencies in content knowledge and professionalism supports the UAM mission to enable students to synthesize knowledge, communicate effectively, use knowledge and technology with intelligence and responsibility.

 

2.      Describe how the major field assessments are based on the mission and goals of the academic unit.

 

The SOE mission includes our commitment to the development of high quality teacher leaders.   These highly qualified teachers are evaluated with instruments build around research-based Pathwise assessments.  Pathwise assessments are specifically designed to assist in the production of highly qualified teacher, as defined and required by NCLB.

 

3.      Describe how data being gathered is being used to assess your unit’s progress.

 

We receive data on state licensure tests that is used to determine what areas of the program need to be adjusted.  We also gather data from our interns when they are in the field which it is used to make changes in the program to better assist our students and assist in improving overall program quality.

 

4.      Describe how faculty is involved in your unit’s assessment process.

 

Due to the fact that the School of Education is accredited by National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the majority of the assessment instruments utilized in the SOE are developed specifically for the ongoing NCATE accreditation process.  Each faculty member is responsible for contributing to the developing specific assessment instruments for their respective courses and data collection from those instruments.

 

5.      Describe multiple measures used in making programmatic changes.

 

For programmatic changes at the undergrad level, the measures or steps would include an SOE study committee making recommendations to the SOE faculty, then the appropriate preliminary notification is submitted to ADE (see attachment for specific ADE requirements).  An NCATE Specialty Program Association (SPA) report (computerized template) may also be required to be completed and submitted to NCATE which is forwarded to the SPA for evaluation.  Assuming the proposed programmatic change requires alteration of the curriculum, then the appropriate paperwork is also submitted to the UAM Curriculum and Standards Committee.  The Arkansas Department of Higher Education is also notified of the programmatic change.

 

Programmatic changes at the graduate level follow similar steps as those at the undergraduate level; however, the UAM Graduate Council is included in the review process and C&S it typically not.

 

6.      Describe feedback from both students and faculty.

 

Feedback from students about possible programmatic changes is typically acquired from student course evaluations, from student interns, and from educational leadership practicum students.  Feedback from faculty members comes from SOE committee work as well as during regularly held (scheduled every fortnight during 2004-05) SOE Faculty and Staff meetings.

 

7.      Describe how the unit plan is cost effective and reflects access, equity, and diversity.

 

 

SOE Undergraduate Enrollment

SOE

Undergraduate SSCH

SOE

Graduate Enrollment

SOE

Graduate

SSCH

Summer II 2004

93

278

273

819

Fall 2004

1,156

3,554

404

1,212

Spring 2005

1,153

3,486

369

1,239

Summer I 2005

949

561

194

582

2004-05 Totals

3,351

7,879

1,240

3,852

Tuition & Fees/hour

 

x $112.50

 

x $144.50

Tuition Generated

 

$886,388

 

$556,614

 

Based on the figures in the chart above, the School of Education generated an estimated $1.44M ($886,388 + 556,614) in tuition and fees alone for the 2004-05 academic year which is in excess of the 1.28M SOE budget for the corresponding fiscal year.  Therefore, strictly from a financial standpoint the SOE is operating in a cost effective manner.

 

Access to both undergraduate and graduate SOE programs is available to all students who meet admission and on-going program criteria.  The high level of importance placed on program equity for minority students and students of non-traditional age is supported by the fact that Equity is one of the four strands of the SOE Conceptual Framework: Knowledge, Pedagogy, Professionalism, and Equity.

 

8.      Describe how your unit assessment system links to research regarding learning theories, active learning strategies, and student centered learning.

 

All programs in the SOE are required to meet all appropriate NCATE and ADE standards.  Because both NCATE and ADE standards are research based and learner centered, the SOE programs meet these important criteria.

 

9.      Describe how students’ verbal and written explanations of their work products demonstrate attainment of your unit’s publicly stated goals and objectives for learning.

 

As stated previously, standards based assessments are utilized to evaluate student performance.  Data from these assessments as well as student evaluations from courses and information from student portfolios are all utilized for program improvement.  Specifically, this data is utilized by SOE working committees as well as by the SOE faculty and staff at regular unit meetings when discussing and considering program improvement issues.

 

10.  Describe how course syllabi state measurable objectives for student learning and provide for assessment of students’ academic achievement.

 

NCATE and ADE requirements include providing clearly listed goals and objectives on all syllabi that are based on appropriate SPA standards.  The specific standard(s) are to be specifically listed next to each goal and objective.  Each assessment is to also be clearly tied to each goal and objective (see attached syllabus for an example).

 

11.  Describe how students are involved in the assessment process and how they participate in your unit’s assessment committee activities.

 

Student feedback regarding the SOE unit assessment activities is obtained through course evaluations, reflection in student portfolios, intern feedback, practicum student feedback, and from alumni surveys.

 

 

 

 

 



UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS-MONTICELLO

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

MLED 4513

COURSE SYLLABUS

FALL 2004

 

Course Title: Teaching and Learning in the Middle School

Credit Hours: 3 Semester Hours

 

Mission Statement

The School of Education strives to create courageous teachers who arouse and sustain change and improvement in a variety of heterogeneous communities.

 

PREREQUISITE: Admittance to the school of education.

 

Required Text

Kellough, R., &  Kellough, N. (2003). Teaching Young Adolescents: A Guide to Methods and Resources, 5th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

 

“This We Believe: Developmentally Responsive Middle Level Schools. A Position Paper of National Middle School Association: Columbus, Ohio.”

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course is designed to study advance methods of instruction, review current research and case studies, and observe and practice components of the middle level concept.

 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

Methods of delivery for this class may include, but are not limited to, case studies, in-class activities, lectures, recitations and discussions, questioning, oral and written presentations, class projects, and formal and informal group work.

 

 

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

The Conceptual Framework of the School of Education is organized around four strands of competence for teacher candidates: acquisition of a knowledge base; development of pedagogical skills; demonstration of social justice and equity; and attainment of professionalism. At the core of the four strands is the student learner, which represents an important philosophical stance that is infused throughout the curriculum and practice of faculty and teacher candidates. Each strand represents an essential component of the teacher education program and is further refined through the identification of indicators of competence within each strand.

 


GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:

 

The candidates will:

           

·        Identify and explain sources of influences on curriculum (CF – Knowledge, Professionalism; TCRI –D3; NMSA Standard 3).

·        Organize content according to facts, concepts and generalizations (CF – Knowledge; NMSA Standard 4).

·        Describe and explain a variety of instructional strategies to integrate the curriculum. (CF – Pedagogy; NMSA Standard 1, 3).

·        Design lesson plans that incorporate various teaching/learning strategies. (CF – Pedagogy; TCRI –D3; NMSA Standard 1, 3).

·        Design and implement integrated curriculum units at the middle school level, selecting an appropriate and relevant theme and incorporating communication and study skills throughout the unit. (CF –Equity; TCRI – A1, B1, B2; NMSA Standard 4).

·        Design lessons that actively engage learners and extend their learning (Bloom’s taxonomy) using a variety of presentation formats and instructional resources. (CF – Equity; TCRI – B2, D3; NMSA Standard 5).

·        Evaluate the process of developing an interdisciplinary unit. (CF – Equity; TCRI – Domain B; NMSA Standard 4).

·        Construct and use multiple assessment strategies that are developmentally appropriate for learners. (CF – Professionalism; TCRI – D2; NMSA Standard 5).

·        Analyze critical issues in assessment based upon literature and case studies. (CF – Professionalism; TCRI – D3; NMSA Standard 7).

·        Participate effectively in the team planning process. (CF – Professionalism; TCRI – Domain B; NMSA Standard 2, 7).

·        Evaluate the effectiveness of teams (CF – Professionalism; NMSA Standard 2, 7).

 

COURSE OUTLINE

 

1.      Making Content Decision:  Influences

A.     Curriculum frameworks, guides, and textbooks

B.     Standardized tests

C.     Instructional resources

D.    Structure of Knowledge

a.      Facts

b.      Concepts

c.       Generalizations

 

2.      Using Strategies to Integrate the Curriculum

 

A.     Bloom’s Taxonomy

B.     Brainstorming

C.     Questioning skills

D.    Cooperative learning

E.     Project-based learning

 

3.      Designing Integrated Curriculum Units

 

A.     Rationale for interdisciplinary instruction

B.     Qualities of good themes

C.     Planning tools

D.    Designing activities

E.     Integrating technology

F.      Planning for diverse learners

 

4.      Understanding the Process of Evaluating Student Learning

 

A.     Purposes of evaluation

B.     Evaluation concepts

C.     Alternative assessment

D.    Issues in grading

E.     Ethical considerations

 

5.      Participating in the Team Planning Process

 

A.     Characteristics of productive teams

B.     The effects of teaming on candidates and teachers

C.     Effective use of team planning time

D.    Evaluating interdisciplinary teams

 

FIELD EXPERIENCE:

 

This course includes a six hour internship in a middle school setting.  Candidates will spend extended time in this middle school placement where they will engage in site-based application of skills.  In working with public school professionals, flexibility will be vital.  The range of possible field experiences may include the following activities (to be determined in consultation with practicing professionals):

 

1.      Interviews of teachers concerning instructional planning and practices

2.      Exploration of curriculum design and implementation

3.      Observation of the team planning process

4.      Participation in team planning

5.      Observation and practice in using a variety of instructional strategies

6.      Planning and delivery of instruction

7.      Evaluation of student learning through varied assessment options

8.      Reflection on teaching episodes and learning outcomes

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

1.      Introduction to action research

2.      Integrated unit plan and exhibition

3.      Article assessments

4.      Reform presentation

5.      Written examinations/assessments

 

 

1.   Introduction to action research:

Candidates will investigate and summarize the action research components of “Secrets of The Teen Brain.”

Standards: CF-Professionalism; TCRI-D3; NMSA Standard 3, 4, 5, 7; Evaluation: Writing Rubric.

 

2.  Integrated unit plan and presentation:

The candidate selects appropriate content to teach and plans effective instruction. The candidate will display knowledge of content and accurately identifies major concepts to be taught in their middle level content area.

Units will include:

·        a variety of instructional strategies for promoting higher order thinking (e.g., direct instruction, inquiry, Socratic lessons, group instruction);

·        teaching materials (e.g., physical models, various technologies);

·        teaching schedules;

·        course assignments;

·        an assessment plan.

Unit Plans will include instruction and assessment sensitive to cultural and learning differences.

The unit plan will be presented using the multimedia presentation rubric.

Standards: CF-Pedagogy; TBO-D3; NMSA Standard 3, 4, 7; Evaluation: Individual/Group Presentation Rubric.

 

3.   Book Presentation:

Candidates will read “First In Flight: Helping Children To Soar In Middle School”. Working in 4-member groups, they will then deliver a presentation that describes how the book could enhance their careers in middle level education.

Standards: CF-Professionalism; TCRI-D3; NMSA Standard 7; Evaluation: Individual/Group Presentation Rubric

 

4. Written examinations:

Candidates will be assessed on chapter objectives.

Standards: CF-Professionalism; TCRI-D3; NMSA Standard 3, 4, 5, 7; Evaluation: Writing Rubric.

 

5. Portfolio:

You are required to include artifacts from this class in your portfolio.

Date Due: Portfolios will be assessed at the end of the semester.

 

 

EVALUATION:

See attached rubrics 

 

GRADE ASSIGNMENT:

Grades will be based on a percentage of total points accumulated at end of the term.  Grades will be assigned as follows:

           

            1. Action research-20%

            2. Integrated Unit Plan and Exhibition-50%

            3. Book Presentation-10%

            4. Written Examination -10%

            5. Portfolio-10%

            90% - 100% = A   80% - 89% = B  70% - 79% = C  60% -   69% = D 0% -   59% = F

* Attached rubrics will influence final grades.

 

 

SPECIAL POLICIES AND INFORMATION:          

 

Candidates With Disabilities

It is the policy of the University of Arkansas-Monticello to accommodate individuals with disabilities pursuant to federal law and the University’s commitment to equal educational opportunities.  It is the responsibility of the student to inform the instructor of any necessary accommodations at the beginning of the course.  Any student with a disability requiring accommodations should contact the office of Special Student Services, located in the Harris Hall.  Telephone (870)460-1154; TDD (870)460-1251; Fax (870)460-1810.

 

School of Education Attendance and Punctuality Policy

It is the policy of the UAM School of Education to strictly enforce attendance and punctuality requirements for all of its educational courses and activities.  Candidates arriving after attendance is taken will be considered absent for the entire class period.  A maximum of two (2) absences will be allowed each semester.  Each additional absence will adversely affect the final grade.  Note:  There are no excused absences.

 

STUDENT CONDUCT STATEMENT

Candidates at the University of Arkansas-Monticello are expected to conduct themselves appropriately keeping in mid that they are subject to the laws of the community and stands of society.  They must not conduct themselves in a manner that disrupts the academic community or breaches the freedom of other candidates to progress academically.  (UAM 2000-2001 Catalog, pgs 42-43).

 

USE OF TECHNOLOGY

Candidates will word-process all papers and out of class assignments.  Candidates are responsible for obtaining an e-mail address at the Information Technology Center.  Candidates will conduct internet research concerning model middle level programs.   Candidates will make multi-media presentations.

 

DIVERSITY

Candidates will be provided opportunities through direct instruction and field experiences to gain the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to provide effective instruction in diverse classroom and communities.  A wide variety of instructional methods will be modeled during the course to meet the needs of a diverse class.  In addition, candidates will design curriculum (including goals, methods, and assessments) suitable for a wide range of candidates.

 

 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:

 

·                    Cheating:  Candidates shall not give, receive, offer, or solicit information on examinations, quizzes, etc. This includes but is not limited to the following classes of dishonesty:

o                                           Copying from another student’s paper.

o                                           Use during the examination of prepared materials, notes, or texts other than those specifically permitted by the instructor.

o                                           Collaboration with another student during the examination.

o                                           Buying, selling, stealing, soliciting, or transmitting an examination or any material purported to be the unreleased contents of coming examinations or the use of any such material.

o                                           Substituting for another person during an examination or allowing such substitutions for oneself.

·                    Collusion: Collusion is defined as obtaining from another party, with out specific approval in advance by the instructor, assistance in the production of work offered for credit, to the extent that the work reflects the ideas of the party consulted rather than those of the person whose name in on the work submitted.

·                    Duplicity: To offer for credit identical or substantially unchanged work in two or more courses, with out specific advanced approval of the instructors involved.

·                    Plagiarism: To adopt and reproduce as one’s own, to appropriate to one’s use, and to incorporate in one’s own work without acknowledgement the ideas or passages from the writings or works of others.

 

For any instance of academic dishonesty that is discovered by the instructor, whether the dishonesty is found to be cheating, collusion, duplicity, or plagiarism, the result for the student or candidates involved will be that the instructor will assign a grade or F for the examination or assignment involved.

 


 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

Armstrong, D., & Savage, T. (1998). Teaching in the secondary school:  An introduction

      (4th ed.).  Upper Saddle River, NJ:  Prentice-Hall.

 

Curry, J., & Samara, J. (Eds.). (1997).  Constructing integrated units for middle school

      learners.  Austin, TX:  Texas Middle School Association.

 

Fogarty, R. (1991)  Ten ways to integrate curriculum.  Educational Leadership, 49(2),

      61-65.

 

Gardner, H.  (1985).  Frames of mind:  The theory of multiple intelligences.  New York:

      Basic Books.

 

Good, T., & Brophy, J. (2000).   Looking in classrooms (8th ed).  New York:  Longman.

 

Johnson, D., &  Johnson, R. (1984).  Circles of Learning: Cooperation in the classroom.

      Alexandria, VA:  ASCD.

 

Kauchak, D., & Eggen, P. (1998).  Learning and teaching:  Research-based methods (3rd

      ed.)  Boston:  Allyn Bacon.

 

Lazer, D. (1994). Multiple intelligence approaches to assessment.  Tucson, AZ: Zephyr.

 

Merenbloom, E. (1991). The team process: A handbook for teachers (3rd ed.). Columbus,

      OH: NMSA.

 

Pate, P. E., Homestead, E., & McGinnis, K. (1997). Making integrated curriculum work:

      Teachers, candidates, and the quest for coherent curriculum.  New York:  Teachers

      College Press

 

Stevenson, C., & Carr, J.(1993).  Integrated studies in the middle grades:  Dancing

      through walls.  New York:  Teachers College Press.

 

Vars, G. (1987).  Interdisciplinary teaching in the middle grades:  Why and how.

      Columbus, OH:  National Middle School Association.

 

Wilen, W., Ishler, M., Hutchison, J., & Kindsvatter, R. (2000).  Dynamics of effective

      teaching (4th ed.).  New York: Longman.

 

 

 


 

Journal Rubric

 

Your Score

Presentation

Illegible or messy  

Legibly written and presented 

Clear, uncluttered, and attractive 

Evidence of pride and care for the journal’s daily use and its potential to springboard future writing ideas 

 

Organization

Pages are out of order and/or physically detached from notebook 

Pages are dated and easily navigable 

Pages are dated, well-ordered, and titled accordingly 

Journal is navigable according to subject, topic, title, and date so thoroughly that no clarification by the author is necessary. 

 

Topical Relevance

Entries have no relation to subject of focus 

Entries are related to subject of focus and include extraneous, unrelated content 

Entries are related to subject of focus, and include supporting or related content 

Entries display full, in-depth engagement with relevant topics and draw personal connections  

 

Evidence of Daily Writing

Many entries are entirely absent from notebook 

Some entries are missing from notebook 

All entries are present, but some reflect partial, haphazard engagement 

All entries are carefully constructed and presented in their entirety 

 

 


 

Unit Design Rubric

 

Your Score

Differentiated Instruction

No differentiation of instruction is mentioned. 

Lesson plan includes minimal differentiated instruction, limited to either gifted candidates OR candidates with special needs. 

Lesson includes some differentiated instruction for gifted candidates and candidates with special needs. 

Lesson clearly offers appropriate, creative, and well-integrated challenges for candidates of all levels, including gifted candidates and candidates with special needs. 

 

Instructional Activities

Activities are unrelated to objectives. Many activities are extraneous and irrelevant. No attempt is made to individualize activities for learning styles or strengths. 

Activities relate peripherally to objectives. Some activities are extraneous or irrelevant. Activities are not accessible to candidates with different learning styles and strengths. 

Activities relate to objectives. A few activities may be extraneous or irrelevant. Activities are accessible to candidates of more than one learning style of strength. 

Activities provide a logical path to meeting objectives. No activities are extraneous or irrelevant. Candidates of many learning styles and strengths can benefit from activities. 

 

Teacher-Created Supporting Materials

No supporting materials are included. 

Supporting materials and student handouts are messy, incomplete, and/or unappealing to candidates. Materials do not enhance lesson. 

Supporting materials and student handouts are clear and complete. Materials enhance lesson. 

Supporting materials and student handouts are clear, complete, and appealing to candidates. Materials enhance lesson significantly. 

 

Resources

Many resources needed for lesson are not included in plan. 

Some resources needed for this lesson are not included in plan. 

Resources needed for this lesson are included in plan. 

Resources needed for this lesson are included in plan, and notes about assembling materials, contacting outside guests, or locating additional resources are included, as well. 

 

Objectives

Objectives are missing, unclear, or are unrelated to standards. 

Objectives do not provide a clear sense of what candidates will know and be able to do as a result of the lesson. Some of the objectives are related to standards. 

Objectives provide some sense of what candidates will know and be able to do as a result of the lesson. Most of the objectives are related to standards. 

Objectives provide a clear sense of what candidates will know and be able to do as a result of the lesson. All objectives are clearly and closely related to standards. 

 

Standards

No standards are mentioned in lesson. Lesson is not related to standards.  

Standards are alluded to in lesson, and lesson is related to standards.  

Some relevant standards are referenced. Lesson is influenced by standards. Too many or too few standards are included. (Lesson may name many standards instead of focusing on important, key standards; alternately, lesson may not name relevant key standards). 

Key standards are referenced. Lesson is guided by standards.  

 

Assessment

Assessment is unrelated to objectives and standards.  

Assessment is somewhat related to objectives and standards. Assessment is not appropriate for all candidates' learning styles and strengths. 

Assessment is related to objectives and standards. Assessment is less accessible for candidates with certain learning styles and strengths. 

Assessment is directly related to objectives and standards. Assessment provides opportunities for candidates with varying learning styles and strengths to excel. 

 

Grade Level Appropriateness

Objectives and activities are inappropriate for the intended grade level. 

Some, but not all, objectives and activities are appropriate for the intended grade level. 

Most objectives and activities are appropriate for the intended grade level. 

All objectives and activities are appropriate for the intended grade level. 

 

Time Allotment

Objectives are not accomplishable for most candidates in the time allotted. 

Objectives may not all be accomplishable for many candidates in the time allotted. 

Objectives are accomplishable by almost all candidates in the time allotted. 

Objectives are accomplishable in the time allotted. 

 


 

 

Oral Presentation Rubric

 

Your Score

Attention to Audience

Did not attempt to engage audience 

Little attempt to engage audience 

Engaged audience and held their attention most of the time by remaining on topic and presenting facts with enthusiasm 

Engaged audience and held their attention throughout with creative articulation, enthusiasm, and clearly focused presentation 

 

Clarity

No apparent logical order of presentation, unclear focus  

Content is loosely connected, transitions lack clarity 

Sequence of information is well-organized for the most part, but more clarity with transitions is needed 

Development of thesis is clear through use of specific and appropriate examples; transitions are clear and create a succinct and even flow 

 

Presentation Length

Greatly exceeding or falling short of allotted time  

Exceeding or falling short of allotted time 

Remained close to the allotted time 

Presented within the allotted time 

 

Content

Thesis is unclear and information appears randomly chosen 

Thesis is clear, but supporting information is disconnected 

Information relates to a clear thesis; many relevant points, but they are somewhat unstructured 

Exceptional use of material that clearly relates to a focused thesis; abundance of various supported materials 

 

Creativity

Delivery is repetitive with little or no variety in presentation techniques 

Material presented with little interpretation or originality 

Some apparent originality displayed through use of original interpretation of presented materials 

Exceptional originality of presented material and interpretation 

 

Speaking Skills

Monotone; speaker seemed uninterested in material 

Little eye contact; fast speaking rate, little expression, mumbling 

Clear articulation of ideas, but apparently lacks confidence with material 

Exceptional confidence with material displayed through poise, clear articulation, eye contact, and enthusiasm 

 


 

 

Multimedia RubricMulRubric

 

 

Your Score

Page Design

Many pages are either cluttered or empty. There is no text/image balance. No attention paid to variation in design. 

Some pages are either cluttered or empty. Inconsistent attention paid to sizing of graphics, placement of graphics and text, and text wrapping. 

Most pages contain well-placed objects, with thoughtful text/image balance. Inconsistent text wrapping. 

Objects on all pages are well placed and sized. Pages are not cluttered or empty. Imaginative and logical text wrapping. 

 

Navigation

Many necessary buttons or tools are missing or difficult to use. Navigation from page to page is difficult or even impossible. 

Not all necessary buttons are present. Navigation from page to page is confusing. 

Navigation from page to page is typically easy. 

Navigation from page to page is consistently easy and logical. 

 

Mechanics

Text contains many spelling/grammar errors. Sentences seem disconnected, and there is carelessness throughout. 

Text contains some spelling/grammar errors. Little logical structure or flow to sentences. Evidence of carelessness in writing. 

Grammar and spelling are nearly flawless. Logical sequence apparent. Some wording is careless. Inconsistency in style. 

Grammar and spelling are flawless and the flow provides a logical pathway of ideas. Consistent and engaging style throughout. 

 

Graphics

Images do not connect to text and/or are not relevant. 

Images are not always relevant. Text citations are not always present and do not connect to images. 

Images are mostly relevant. Text citations are usually present and identify the images. 

Images are relevant, and complement the text. Each image is cited in the text and identified. The number of images is appropriate. 

 

Planning

Storyboard is incomplete. Little or no details about graphics, content, formatting, or effects are provided. 

Storyboard lacks some important details about graphics, content, formatting, and effects. 

Storyboard is mostly complete. Includes many important details about graphics, content, formatting, and effects. 

Storyboard is complete. All necessary information about graphics, content, formatting, and effects is included. 

 

Content

Information is cursory or incorrect. Little understanding of content is evident from presentation. 

Some solid information presented; however, some information is incorrect or cursory. 

Information is clear and correct throughout most of presentation. 

Information is well presented, clear, and correct throughout. 

 

Effects

Effects are limited or not present. 

One or more than one type of effect is used; however, some or all effects detract from presentation. 

More than one type of effect is used. Effects enhance presentation. 

Effects are varied, yet cohesive, and they significantly enrich the presentation. 

 

 

 

 

Writing RubricWriting rubric

 

Your Score

Structural Organization

Essay lacks logical progression of
ideas
 

Essay includes brief skeleton (introduction, body, conclusion) but lacks transitions 

Essay includes logical progression of ideas aided by clear transitions 

Essay is powerfully organized and fully developed  

 

Understanding of Material

Apparent misunderstanding of material 

Limited understanding of material displayed by vague, unclear language 

Developing understanding of material 

Clear understanding of material displayed by clear, concrete language and complex ideas 

 

Focus

Essay addresses topic but loses focus by including irrelevant ideas 

Essay is focused on topic and includes few loosely related ideas 

Essay is focused on the topic and includes relevant ideas 

The essay is focused, purposeful, and reflects clear insight and ideas 

 

Mechanics

Frequent errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation 

Errors in grammar and punctuation, but spelling has been proofread 

Occasional grammatical errors and questionable word choice  

Nearly error-free which reflects clear understanding and thorough proofreading 

 

Support

Few to no solid supporting ideas or evidence for the essay content 

Some supporting ideas and/or evidence for the essay content 

Support lacks specificity and is loosely developed 

Specific, developed details and superior support and evidence in the essay content 

 


 

 

Case Study RubricCase Study of Middle Level Teacher and Student

 

Your Score

Standard One: Young Adolescent Development.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide no opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide minimal opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide some opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide opportunities that support student development and learning. 

 

Standard Two: Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work do not successfully within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with minimal success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with some success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within these organizational components. 

 

Standard Three:

Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they do not use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they minimally use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate some
understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they sometime use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice. 

 

Standard Four:

Middle Level Teaching Fields.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create no meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create minimal meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create some meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

 

Standard Seven:

Middle Level Professional Roles.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they do not engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they minimally engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they sometime engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

 

 


 

 

Research Project RubricProgram Research Project

 

Your Score

Standard One:

Young Adolescent Development.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide no opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide minimal opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide some opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide opportunities that support student development and learning. 

 

Standard Two:

Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work do not successfully within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with minimal success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with some success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within these organizational components. 

 

Standard Three:

Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they do not use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they minimally use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate some
understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they sometime use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice. 

 

Standard Four:

Middle Level Teaching Fields.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create no meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create minimal meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create some meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

 

Standard Five:

Middle Level Instruction/Assessment.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they do not employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ a minimal variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ some variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

 

Standard Seven :

Middle Level Professional Roles.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they do not engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they minimally engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they sometime engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

 


 

Professional Portfolio RubricMiddle School Portfolio

 

Your Score

Standard One:

Young Adolescent Development.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide no opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide minimal opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide some opportunities that support student development and learning. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide opportunities that support student development and learning. 

 

Standard Two:

Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work do not successfully within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with minimal success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work with some success within these organizational components. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within these organizational components. 

 

Standard Three:

Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they do not use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they minimally use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate some
understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they sometime use this knowledge in their practice. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice. 

 

Standard Four:

Middle Level Teaching Fields.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create no meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create minimal meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create some meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding or use of the central concepts, tools of inquiry, standards, and structures of content in their chosen teaching fields, and they create meaningful learning experiences that develop all young adolescents’ competence in subject matter and skills. 

 

Standard Five:

Middle Level Instruction/Assessment.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they do not employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ a minimal variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ some variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding or use of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment, and they employ a variety of strategies for a developmentally appropriate climate to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of all young adolescents. 

 

Standard Six:

Family and Community Involvement.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members, and they do not use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members, and they minimally use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members, and they sometime use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members, and they use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents. 

 

Standard Seven:

Middle Level Professional Roles.

Candidates demonstrate no understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they do not engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate minimal understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they minimally engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate some understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they sometime engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals. 

Candidates demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals.